Here’s Simple Formula for Getting Admission Into Ivy League University

Following comment by an Anonymous reader at How I Got into Ivy League with GRE 1170

From H4 Visa to Ivy League:

I am a Ph.D. student at an Ivy league too. But what I was doing five years ago was completely a different story!

If I hadn’t made the switch, I would have been making roti at home. Here’s my simple secret formula on how to get admission into Ivy League University.

My Secret Formula = Undergraduate research experience + voluntary work + freelance (open source projects).

It’s Simple. Create something!

I came to U.S. on H4 (was qualified professional with a B.Com and post-graduate diploma) but was quite unhappy and depressed as many others who came to U.S in my visa status.

For a while, it seemed like my career is over with my three-year degree and some work experience. I couldn’t get into a University for Masters because of the “one year gap” that engineering students luckily don’t have to deal with.

After a couple of rejects and heartbreaks, I decided to do my Bachelors degree again, pursue something I enjoy, and that can connect my past work experience, and be positive. I started out with community college for one year of general education courses and then transferred to a state university to complete a Bachelor’s in Cognitive Science.

I completed my Bachelor’s degree in 3 years  but landed a 4-year degree in the end with tons of research experience, professional contacts, and recommendations.

Now I was even with all the other 4-year Undergraduates from all over the world- only difference (a) U.S Bachelor’s degree + 3 years of undergraduate research experience + an independent research project.

I took a break and one year later, took the GRE (1230 not a great score!) and applied to 2 universities only because of geographic limitations. One of the university was an Ivy League Graduate school.

I got admits into both universities and am now studying here at the Ivy League with a scholarship.

Which Ivy League University?

People questioned that how can they know if the person was studying in Ivy League.

I can confirm the person who posted this comment is from Columbia University based on the location of her IP Address from where her comment was published. WordPress will include the IP address of the user who is writing a comment. It gets stored along with the comment name, email and the content. Now, you know the formula to get into Ivy League.

It’s Simple. Create Something.

5 Comments

  1. AruniRC on July 23, 2011 at 12:21 PM

    @HSB,
    the point i guess is not whether he’s really in an Ivy college or not, we can take that fact at face value. But how much funding can be expected?

  2. Sid on July 23, 2011 at 12:07 PM

    Wow..Congratulations. Not specifically making it to an Ivy school, but for bagging a scholarship. Personally what I have seen, if you have a decent all round profile, then making it to an Ivy isn’t such a big deal ( I myself made it) but bagging a funding is like truly awesome. Well done.

  3. Rakesh on July 23, 2011 at 11:44 AM

    Looks good….shows some dedication and hard work and an aim in life….got what he deserved…….

    However, one thing that not every one can do is go back and do another bachelor’s degree to pursue his dreams……..

    But he did it…so that displays his dedication….

  4. KS on July 23, 2011 at 11:12 AM

    “I couldn’t get into a university for Masters because of the “one year gap” that engineering students luckily don’t have to deal with.” – What dies that mean? It is not like there is a gap and 4 yr Engg graduates are getting away jus bcos it is a 4 yr course

    It seems like quiet a baggage due to the 3 yr rather thn the 4 yr. It is not that much to worry about.

  5. Elia123 on July 21, 2011 at 4:59 PM

    When you mentioned freelance work, did you work on programming/software related projects? If you did, how did you even get that offer because, you did your bachelor’s in a field not related to Computer Science?

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